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AI vs. AI in the Small Business Cyber Security Fight Blog Feature
Courtney Casey

By: Courtney Casey on August 14th, 2019

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AI vs. AI in the Small Business Cyber Security Fight

Cyber Security

Unless you stop to think about it, you probably won’t recognize all the ways that you’re interacting with artificial intelligence (AI) in your everyday life.

AI is what personalizes your social media feeds and search results. AI makes your virtual assistant seem like “she” really knows you. AI reads your messages and emails giving you suggestions on what to reply based on the content of the message you received.

While AI makes us faster, more accurate or seemingly smarter, the bad actors in the cyber crime ecosystem are also maximizing on this evolving technology, making it increasingly necessary to fight fire with fire.

Artificial Intelligence is Evolving Cyber Tactics

Just about any technology that has made business and communications easier for us in the 21st century, has also been exploited by cyber criminals.

The development of SaaS, or Software-as-a-Service, has been especially instrumental at putting cyber crime tools in the hands of people who only have to pay a subscription fee to become an internet predator.

Now, hackers are using AI to power up their attack tools to:

  • Develop malware that evades normal security layers.
  • Become more focused in identifying potential targets.
  • Increase the number of targets in their scopes.

This means you’re more vulnerable than you've ever been before, and your data and systems could be compromised long before you realize anything has happened.

Fight AI with AI

While AI is helping cyber criminals move in stealth mode, it’s improving the way that security detects intruders.

Advanced security software tools use artificial intelligence to become familiar with the workings of a particular network so that they can send out an alert when there’s an anomaly.

The software learns the normal traffic patterns of data flowing in and out of the network. It learns to recognize the behavior patterns of user machines; when people log in and out; their web browsing habits and the network destinations they frequent.

Then, when the traffic patterns change or user behavior veers from the normal, AI springs into action to determine if there’s an intruder, and to take action.

AI Available Only Within Advanced Security Tools

Don’t assume that you’re getting the help of AI in detecting and handling cyber intrusions unless you’re using advanced security software tools. Sophisticated security software is expensive and not included in every managed IT service providers’ (MSP) toolbox.

Even if your MSP does have the advanced tools, they could be an add-on service.

AI Like an Immune System for your Network

Think of security like your body’s immune system. When you have a strong immune system, your body can recognize and eliminate many disease threats before they become full blown problems.

Artificial Intelligence in security tools work in a similar way, improving your ability to detect activity that lies outside of the norm, and attack intruders before they have a chance to do harm.

Are You SURE You’re Secure?

If you're not certain that what your IT support company is doing enough to manage the increasing risk of cyber attack, then it's a good time to get an objective assessment and weigh your options. Contact us at 800-481-4369 to schedule a time to talk. 

 

About Courtney Casey

In an industry dominated by men, Courtney Casey, Director of Marketing for Accent Computer Solutions, Inc., is making her mark on the world of information technology. Courtney has been immersed in the IT field most of her life and has been molded into the tech savvy expert she is today. She began working for Accent while earning her Bachelor's degree from California State University, Long Beach. Known in the Inland Empire as the "Tech Girl," Courtney is a regular columnist for the region's newspaper of record, The Press-Enterprise. Her columns address topical news trends, new technology products, and offer advice on how to embrace technology or avoid common IT pitfalls.